Consider the Butterfly

Did you know that…the color in a butterfly’s wings does not come from pigment. The color is produced prism-like by light reflected by their transparent wing scales. Stranger yet, no moth or butterfly eats solid food (though some butterflies drink nectar); some can not even take in moisture. The life span of most butterflies is very short, usually just enough to lay their eggs. Many butterflies migrate from one region to another, either individually or in swarms. The greatest migration in North America occurs when companies of Monarch butterflies travel from Canada southward to Central America. When they finally roost at their destination, so many crowd the forest that entire trees appear to be covered with bright orange moving leaves! It is a great mystery how the descendants of these Monarchs later find their way back north to their summering place. Stranger yet, their great-great-grandchildren later find their way back south to the tree of their great-great-grandparents.

Their Creator designed them with truly amazing abilities! The world’s fastest butterfly is the Monarch with a record of 17 miles per hour. The brain capabilities of these small insects is mind-boggling. In a space often no bigger than a speck, their Creator designed a sophisticated brain that enables them to see, smell, taste, fly and navigate with such great precision that they can travel enormous distances and find the very tree where their great-great-great-grandmother laid an egg. Their highly-miniaturized brains put our computers and aircraft avionics to shame. Who could make a self-propelled, self-guided airplane as small as a butterfly that could do the same things, totally independently? Traveling so many miles, landing many times, making so many accurate, in-flight navigation corrections, and doing it all with so little fuel—and then reproduce itself at the end? No one but God could make such a marvelous creature as a butterfly.

Contributed by: Ed Vasicek

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